New Mexico Police Officers Benefit from Virtual Reality Training

Police officers in New Mexico utilize VR for de-escalation training.

As police departments around the country respond to scrutiny for their use of force, New Mexico police departments are trying something different to stay out of the spotlight. They’re using virtual reality to train their officers.

In Los Alamos (New Mexico), a city known for its technology, will now be known for their police department's utilization of new technology. On Monday, the Los Alamos Police Department showcased their new Apex Officer virtual reality training program.

Although Los Alamos hasn’t had a murder since 2009, and officer-involved shootings are rare, they believe their Apex Officer virtual reality program will pay off.

“To be able to work everything from crisis intervention training to escalation, de-escalation training, active shooter situations. Essentially, we have an unlimited amount of possibilities with this system,” says Sgt. Chris Ross with the Los Alamos Police Department.

LAPD Sgt. Chris Ross looks on as KOB 4 reporter Ryan Laughlin joined the Los Alamos Daily Post today in covering a virtual reality training session at the LAPD
LAPD Sgt. Chris Ross looks on as KOB 4 reporter Ryan Laughlin joined the Los Alamos Daily Post today in covering a virtual reality training session at the LAPD. Photo by John McHale/ladailypost.com

All 35 of Los Alamos police officers have gone through the virtual reality training and will continue to utilize the system every few months with refresher courses. “We’re always trying to get better in law enforcement. We are constantly out there trying to improve and this technology is going to give us that ability to improve our services that we’re offering to the community that we’re out there interacting with,” said Sgt. Ross.

Learn more about how Los Alamos Police Department succeeds with Apex Officer in the Los Alamos PD x Apex Officer Case Study.

“They can change what that suspect is doing based upon what the officer is doing immediately. So, if the officer is saying the right things when it comes to a crisis intervention, he can de-escalate it. If the officer is saying the wrong things, he can escalate the situation and then get that positive feedback right afterwards,” said Sgt. Ross.

This article was originally shared by KRQE's in an article titled: Los Alamos police implementing virtual reality de-escalation training.

About the Author

Carey Rhodes
Marketing Manager

Marketing Manger at Apex Officer